There’s something unique about you.

Woman wearing colorful makeup in hi-tech fashion. Her hand is painted gold with splashes of color.
Woman wearing colorful makeup in hi-tech fashion. Her hand is painted gold with splashes of color.
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Finding out who you are — what you’re good at, what you stand for, and what inspires you to travel down certain paths — is an amazing adventure. If you asked me five years ago who I was, my answer would be quite different from today. I’ve spent quite a bit of time discovering not only what I can do but also what makes me tick.

Self-discovery is both a scary and exciting process. The more we learn about ourselves, the more apt we are to not lend so much weight to what others think. …


A 2-minute, eye-opening primer

Social media engagement icons fly over a cityscape.
Social media engagement icons fly over a cityscape.
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So, you’ve created something, and now you want to push it out to the masses. Obviously, you want to reach more than a dozen people, and, let’s be honest, unless Elon musk is your long-lost uncle, you’d do anything to make sure the world sees your work. Maybe even a little praying.

There are three core reasons content — whether textual, audial, or visual — goes viral.

  • A well-planned marketing campaign that launches at the perfect time
  • Current events
  • Pure luck (good or bad)

Sometimes it’s a combination of the three, but usually, one is enough to catapult something to…


Writing and editing 2-minute reads is no easy task

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2 Minute Madness’ top creators have a few things in common. These are the folk who make it ridiculously easy for editors to make their work shine. As you likely suspect, they represent a small percentage of the publication’s contributors.

Since we’d like to see the number of featured contributors grow — we’re all about helping creators realize their goals — we love sharing what makes 2 Minute Madness’s relationship with writers tick perfectly.

Here are the top five common traits found in prime writers’ stories:

  • They run two minutes — no more, no less. You’d be surprised how many…


Let’s start making memories great again

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A few months back, my 21-year-old nephew texted me, asking to set an appointment to talk for a bit. He was interning as a videographer and editor in Jacksonville. The gig has since turned into a full-time job, and the texts have been flowing more sporadically than usual.

It was inevitable. Young family members grow up. They go to college and get jobs. The older ones — parents and grandparents — tend to go to bed earlier and nap in the afternoons. …


Stop writing about things that don’t grab you so tight you must write

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All writers have sat in front of a screen, staring at a blinking cursor, mind void of what to write about next. After several brain struggle moments, we scour the internet for pre-fab writer prompts and pose questions in groups about where others find ideas. Chances are, though, you’re likely extending the amount of time spent on the wrong issue.

When it comes to writer’s block and poor quality output, the problem isn’t so much a lack of ideas as it is accepting any idea and forcing yourself to write about it. …


You shouldn’t have to dodge wrenches

Photo mashup: albertyurolaits — licensed via Freepik premium, and publicity pic from Dodgeball: A True Underdog Story.

Ahh, LinkedIn. A place where professionals could once network, sans the typical spam content that flooded our email inboxes. A place where we have to duck, dive and dodge sneaky salespeople and beggars to get a few minutes of pro-time in.

The best way I can explain LinkedIn messaging is this: Have you ever seen the movie Dodgeball: A True Underdog Story? If you haven’t, you missed out on one of life’s hilarious pleasures, or possibly 92 minutes of life you’ll never get back.

To save his gym, Peter LaFleur (Vince Vaughn) forms a Dodgeball team to enter a Las…


It‘s no longer a secret and it sounds… well, gross

Hand holding a platter of mango slices. Another hand is dipping the slice into a bowl of sauce.
Hand holding a platter of mango slices. Another hand is dipping the slice into a bowl of sauce.
Photo by zilvergolf — licensed via Freepik premium

I love words. I adore the English language and embrace the notion that we can break the rules so long as it aligns with our branded voice. But there’s a problem with some modern phrases: they’re inaccurate and sometimes gross.

When I first heard the phrase secret sauce to describe the one compelling thing hardly anyone ever thinks about that makes something work brilliantly, I thought: do they mean special sauce, like McDonald’s?

I get the concept behind the term. I’m sure the first handful of times it was used to describe a company’s success or a leader’s feat caught…


Traffic is only part of the equation

A woman reviews analytics on her laptop. A city landscape through the window is in the background.
A woman reviews analytics on her laptop. A city landscape through the window is in the background.
Photo by biancoblue — licensed via Freepik premium

Any writer knows that readers are essential to growth. So, it makes sense that marketing plays a huge role in directing potential readers to one’s work. Online, this comes in the form of web traffic — the visitors to a story’s or article’s page.

Traffic is necessary, but it’s only part of the equation. It’s not what tells you if readers appreciate what you have to say.

Aside from your followers or subscribers, the number of people landing on your work is representative of two things:

  • how it’s marketed via various online channels (including search engines)
  • how many people are…


Knowing the “why” is more important than “how right now”

A woman uses a laptop while taking notes with a pen and notebook.
A woman uses a laptop while taking notes with a pen and notebook.
Photo by greatkim — licensed via Freepik premium

Learning anything new isn’t always easy. So it makes sense that more than half of YouTube’s audience uses the platform to learn how to do things they’ve never done before. Learning in private eliminates the possibility of others’ realizing what you don’t know.

But are we actually learning when we scrub videos and skim articles to find “hacks” and shortcuts?

In the ’90s, I spent hundreds of hours developing computer training materials for both the US government and the private sector. I trained thousands how to use Windows 95/98 and associated Microsoft programs.

If there is one key takeaway from…


Even if half of them don’t understand its meaning

Photo by Pamela Hazelton

No, Memorial Day isn’t canceled. Beaches, camps, parks, bars, and backyards will be packed. Thousands of parades will take place across the US, and the watermelon will be succulent. Sadly, most won’t pay any mind as to why it’s a national holiday.

I’m torn about the legitimacy of College Reform’s video showing college students ready and willing to sign a fake petition to cancel Memorial Day over American imperialism. Though, I wouldn’t be that shocked.

Half of America doesn’t understand the true meaning of Memorial Day. …

Pamela Hazelton

Avid writer, marketer & business consultant. // Reward yourself a little every day. 🆆🅾🆁🅺 + 🅻🅸🅵🅴 🅱🅰🅻🅰🅽🅲🅴

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